THE oldman river is the source of lethbridge's water

The Livingstone-Porcupine Hills provide habitat for fish and wildlife, including some of the last remaining cold water streams in the Crown of the Continent for the highly threatened westslope cutthroat trout and bull trout. The region also connects grizzly bear populations within the Crown of the Continent, important in sustaining genetic diversity. The Oldman River headwaters lie in this area, and provide most of the water to all downstream communities, including the City of Lethbridge.  

First Nations, including the Piikani (Peigan), Nitsitapii (Blackfoot), Siksika, Kainaiwa (Blood), Ĩyãħé Nakoda (Stoney) and K'tunaxa First Nations have travelled, hunted and fished throughout this region. The Oldman headwaters is of great cultural significance for the Blackfoot, as evidenced in traditional stories of how Napi the Creator made the mountains, the rivers and animals that the Blackfoot depend on.     

Hiking, fishing, hunting, horseback riding and camping have long been enjoyed by both visitors to, and residents of, this beautiful landscape. More recently, off-highway vehicles (OHVs) have moved into this area to use access roads originally created for industrial use.


Where is Livingstone-Porcupine Hills?

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extensive industrial uses affect ecosystem health

The Livingstone-Porcupine Hills are used extensively for logging, energy, pipeline and powerline development. Following the opening of the land to industry, unmanaged motorized recreation and random camping has grown to be a major threat to ecosystem and source water health.

Photo credit: Connie Simmons

Photo credit: Connie Simmons

be a part of the solution

The Livingstone-Porcupine Hills provide habitat for fish and wildlife, including some of the last remaining cold water streams in the Crown of the Continent for the highly threatened westslope cutthroat trout and bull trout.

The government is working on a science-based recreation management plan for the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills.

Protecting critical source waters and key species within the carrying capacity of the region is a foundation of the planning process, while also providing designated routes for motorized and non-motorized recreation use, and nodes for rustic group camping experiences.  

We are working collaboratively with ranchers, land-owners, biologists, municipal districts and other concerned citizens to address the need to develop and enact a balanced plan for recreational- and land-use management of public lands in the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills.

Add your voice and help set a precedent for recreation management along Alberta’s iconic East Slopes.

 

What you can do

Thank Premier Notley, Minister Phillips and Alberta’s public servants for their hard work on the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills Land Footprint Management Plan.

Support non-motorized recreation in Alberta by becoming an Outdoor Recreation Council of Alberta member. Only two per cent of the population in southern Alberta use OHVs, so support for the majority of people who prefer quiet recreation and non-motorized access is appreciated.